3.14.2008

What We're Reading

Alisa is reading
Black Baby White Hands: A View from the Crib by Jaiya John:
Jaiya John has the distinction of being the first African American baby adopted by a white family in the state of New Mexico. John’s lyrical memoir details his life as a black child growing up in a mostly-white community during the late 1960s and ‘70s. This childhood branded in him a burning passion for giving his life to improve the way human beings relate to each other. Jaiya studied psychology at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon, and earned his doctorate from the University of California, Santa Cruz in social psychology.

Vince is reading
I'm Chocolate, You're Vanilla: Raising Healthy Black and Biracial Children in a Race-Conscious World by Marguerite Wright:
A child's concept of race is quite different from that of an adult. Young children perceive skin color as magical--even changeable--and unlike adults, are incapable of understanding adult predjudices surrounding race and racism. Just as children learn to walk and talk, they likewise come to understand race in a series of predictable stages.
Based on Marguerite A. Wright's research and clinical experience, I'm Chocolate, You're Vanilla teaches us that the color-blindness of early childhood can, and must, be taken advantage of in order to guide the positive development of a child's self-esteem.
Wright answers some fundamental questions about children and race including:
-What do children know and understand about the color of their skin?
- When do children understand the concept of race?
-Are there warning signs that a child is being adversely affected by racial prejudice?
-How can adults avoid instilling in children their own negative perceptions and prejudices?
-What can parents do to prepare their children to overcome the racism they are likely to encounter?
-How can schools lessen the impact of racism?

With wisdom and compassion, I'm Chocolate, You're Vanilla spells out how to educate black and biracial children about race, while preserving their innate resilience and optimism--the birthright of all children

We'll keep you posted about the content and insight from each of these authors.

4 comments:

Travis and Lindsey's Ethiopia Adoption said...

I am looking forward to your insight on each of these books, we are also with AWAA and have recently switched over from ES. We are regathering all of our documents for our dossier. Please keep our YG updated about your readings :)

Zack & Rebecca Caldwell said...

We have been reading some parenting books...but nothing regarding race as of yet. We really need to do that. I might try one of those...thanks for the info!

Zack & Rebecca Caldwell said...

Hey Alisa!! You have been tagged...visit our blog for all the details :)

mattandkristy said...

Thanks for sharing these resources! I'll definetely be looking these up!
Kristy Low - AWAA Family

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